Figgins Estate Red Wine 2012

$109.99

SKU 25627

750ml

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Vintage 2012 was a grower's dream, especially in high elevation sites like Figgins Estate. I believe our 2012 is a perfect single vineyard reflection of this spectacular year and is our finest FIGGINS to date. The wine is simply loaded with heady floral aromatics, deep pure fruit of blueberries and blackberries, spice and toast, and has a suptuous texture laced with fresh acidity that is irresistible. I am tremendously proud of this wine and cannot wait for you to experience it. It is drinking delicoiusly right now and is so balanced that I am confident it will cellar gorgeously for two to three decades.
Category Red Wine
Varietals
Country United States
Region Washington
Appellation Walla Walla Valley
Brand Figgins
Alcohol/vol 14.6%
  • wa96+

Wine AdvocateThe Figgins 2012 Estate Red Wine is flat-out knockout stuff. Layered, gorgeously concentrated, full-bodied, and balanced, this Cabernet Sauvignon-dominated blend gives up sensational notes of cassis, black raspberry toasted bread and sweet spice on the nose. Ultra-pure, elegant and silky, it has the texture to drink nicely today, yet will age effortlessly for two decades or more. Coming from the higher elevation, eastern edge of Walla Walla (1500-1750 feet above sea level), it spent 22 months in 70% new French oak and 30% in once used barrels. This is one of the top Cabernets coming out of Washington and readers should not miss it.

Jeb Dunnuck, June 2015
  • ws94

Wine SpectatorTaut, focused, generous and distinctive, splaying out plum, currant, espresso and spice flavors against nippy tannins. Comes into sharp focus as the meaty, complex finish lingers. Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot and Petit Verdot. Best from 2017 through 2022. 2,646 cases made.

Harvey Steiman, November 15, 2015
  • we94

Wine EnthusiastClosed-up at present, this aromatic brooder has notes of red and black fruit, scorched earth and herbs, along with a floral top note. It has a mountain-fruit profile of firm, chewy tannins, tart acids and dense flavors. Time in the cellar is required to fully appreciate it. Let it be until at least 2020 but it should have a good 15 years beyond that.

Sean Sullivan, November 1, 2015